Honorary AAAE Fellows 2013

Honorary Distinguished Fellow of the African Association of Agricultural Economists is a lifetime recognition awarded to outstanding individuals in acknowledgment of their enormous scholarly and leadership contributions in the field of agricultural economics to African agriculture over years.  The 2013 Fellow Awards were presented to the following scholars, during the 4th International Conference of the African Association of Agricultural Economists (4ICAAAE), that took place in Hammamet, Tunisia, from 22-25 September, 2013.

Dr. Juliana Rwelamira (Tanzania) – Managing Director, Sasakawa Africa Association

Dr Juliana Rwelamira is a Tanzanian national and the immediate former vice president of the African Association of Agricultural Economists. She is currently the Managing Director of Sasakawa Africa Association (SAA) based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, a position she has held since 2009. Her key role is to oversee its Africa-based operations from Addis Ababa, as it re-organises to meet the challenges of a green revolution in Africa.

An agricultural economist by profession with over 35 years of experience in agricultural and agribusiness development in Sub-Saharan Africa, Dr. Rwelamira is a passionate and true advocate of agriculture as a means of achieving true economic growth in Africa. She previously worked as a senior manager in the Marketing and Economic and Research division of the National Agricultural Marketing Council (NAMC), a statutory body based in Pretoria which advises South Africa’s Ministry of Agriculture and its agricultural industry on the marketing of agricultural products. She also worked as a Practice Area Manager for five years in Southern Africa for ECIAfrica Consulting International, an agricultural and rural consulting firm with its headquarters in Bethesda, USA. This included improving the nutrition of HIV/AIDS sufferers in Ethiopia, leading a team for the World Bank funded Malawi community-based Rural Land Development Programme, and the USAID-funded Agriculture Development and Finance programme in Angola. 

Dr Rwelamira was educated at the University of Dar-es-Salaam (Tanzania); University of Florida (USA), and gained her PhD in Agricultural Economics at the University of Pretoria in South Africa. Her academic career has included the University of Pretoria, as a director of the Post Graduate School of Agriculture and Rural Development; the University of Stellenbosch, as a senior researcher at the Institute for Futures Research; and the University of Swaziland as a lecturer on agricultural economics. She has been a consultant to the Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) on socio-economic and gender analysis-related issues and gender issues in Animal Traction Networks. She has trained rural women leaders in Lesotho, Swaziland and South Africa and, for UNICEF, advised the Basotho Rural Women in Development programme, which helped to establish income generating economic activities to alleviate poverty among women and children in Lesotho.  

She has analyzed and promoted sustainable small, medium and micro-enterprises for the Land and Agricultural Policy Centre in South Africa, and studied post-production constraints for maize and cassava among rural communities in Zambia. 

Juliana was inducted as a Distinguished Fellow of the African Association of Agricultural Economists 2013, in recognition to her enormous scholarly contributions and leadership in the field of agricultural economics, especially her sterling contributions to African agriculture over many years. 

Rev. Prof. Samuel Asuming-Brempong  (Ghana) Senior Lecturer, Agricultural Economics & Agribusiness, University of Ghana, Legon 

Rev. Prof. Samuel Asuming-Brempong is currently the FAC-CAADP Coordinator for the Future Agricultures Consortium (FAC), and a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Agricultural Economics & Agribusiness (DAEA), University of Ghana, Legon, Accra, Ghana. During the period of September 2001 to September 2004, he was the Head of Department of DAEA, and a member of the Academic Board of the University of Ghana. He had previously served as a member of the Academic Board of Michigan State University (representing Graduate Students); and Board Member of the Society for International Development (SID), Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA. He currently serves on the Cadbury Cocoa Partnership (CCP) Board in Ghana. In 2007 he was a Visiting Senior Lecturer at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. Since 2003 he has been a Visiting Senior Lecturer both at the Economic Policy Management Program at the Economics Department, and the Development Studies Program at the Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research (ISSER), both at the University of Ghana. 

Samuel Asuming Brempong earned a PhD degree (Agricultural Economics) from Michigan State University, USA, and an MSc degree (Agricultural Economics) and  MA degree (Economics) from the same university. He also earned an MSc degree (Agricultural Economics) from the University of the Philippines at Los Banos/ International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in the Philippines, and a BSc degree (Agriculture, with a specialization in Agricultural Economics) from the University of Ghana. 

Among his professional interest areas are Agricultural and Rural Development; Food Security and Sustainability, Agricultural Marketing and Agri-Food Systems, Environmental and Resource Economics, Project Analysis, Policy Analysis and Child Labour issues. He has been with the University of Ghana in various capacities, and during the 22 year period has coordinated a number of studies ranging from Cocoa Child Labour Study to Poverty and Social Impact Analysis. He has been involved in a number of studies with several international organizations as well, including the World Bank, UNDP, FAO, DfID, USAID, African Rural Policy Analysis Network, World Cocoa Foundation, CIDA, and JICA. He was the Research Team Leader for the World Cocoa Foundation/Ministry of Manpower Youth and Employment’s Child Labour Certification process in Ghana’s Cocoa Production in both the Pilot and the Scale Up phases – 2006 to 2008. He had previously served as the Team Leader in an FAO-University of Ghana Roles of Agriculture country case study (among several other developing country case studies). He currently leads the FAC Commercialization of Agriculture Study in Ghana. In addition to a number of journal articles and book chapters he has single-handedly and in conjunction with others co-authored several technical reports.

Samuel was inducted as a Distinguished Fellow of the African Association of Agricultural Economists 2013, in recognition to his enormous scholarly contributions and leadership in the field of agricultural economics, especially his contributions to African agriculture over many years. 

Dr. Hugo De Groote – (Kenya)  ‎Agricultural Economist/Principal Scientist, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) 

Dr. Hugo De Groote is a Principal Scientist/Agricultural Economist at at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) in Kenya. He has an M.Sc. in tropical agriculture from the University of Ghent, Belgium, and a Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics from the University of Wisconsin, U.S.A. His research activities include the economic analysis and participatory evaluation of new technologies (stress resistant maize varieties, nutritionally enhanced maize varieties, crop management techniques, …) and analysis of policies and institutions relevant to these technologies (such as seed systems, credit and extension, and biotechnology policies). 

Previously, Hugo was a coordinator of the biological control project at IITA, in Benin, conducting economic analysis and participatory evaluation of biological control of pests such as water hyacinth, locusts and mango mealybug. Dr. De Groote also worked in Farming Systems Research, developing and evaluating new technologies in Mali, and evaluated group-based credit and loan associations as a post-doc with IFPRI, also in Mali. Before becoming a researcher, he worked as an agriculturalist in rural development for Non-Governmental Organizations in Togo and Thailand.

Hugo has worked and lived in Kenya for over 15 years. He was inducted as a Distinguished Fellow of the African Association of Agricultural Economists 2013, in recognition to his enormous scholarly contributions and leadership in the field of agricultural economics, especially his contributions to African agriculture over many years. 

Hugo was inducted as a Distinguished Fellow of the African Association of Agricultural Economists 2013, in recognition to his enormous scholarly contributions and leadership in the field of agricultural economics, especially his contributions to African agriculture over many years. 

Some of his many publications can be accessed through the following links:

http://ke.linkedin.com/pub/hugo-de-groote/10/863/70

http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=u5LEXXkAAAAJ&hl=en

 

Prof. Thomas Jayne (USA) - Professor, International Development, Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics, Michigan State University

Prof. Thomas Jayne’s career has been devoted to working with African colleagues to promote effective policy responses to poverty in Africa.  Jayne is Professor in the Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics at Michigan State University, is Adjunct Professor at the Indaba Agricultural Policy Research Institute in Lusaka, Zambia, and is a Fellow of the African Association of Agricultural Economists.  His research focuses on agricultural productivity and markets, land use dynamics, and how agricultural policies and programs can contribute to sustainable and equitable development.  Jayne sits on the editorial boards of two professional journals, received a top paper award in 2004 by the International Association of Agricultural Economists, co-authored a paper awarded the T.W. Schultz Award at the 2009 International Association of Agricultural Economists Triennial Meetings, received the 2009 Outstanding Article Award in Agricultural Economics, and co-authored a paper awarded First Prize at the 2010 tri-annual meetings of the African Association of Agricultural Economists.  

Jayne also received a Research Excellence Award in 2011 from MSU’s Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics Department.  Jayne currently serves on the advisory boards of several initiatives dedicated to building institutional and analytical capacity in sub-Saharan Africa, including the Global Development Network’s Global Research Capacity Building Program, and the Regional Network of Agricultural Policy Research Institutes in Eastern and Southern Africa.

He was inducted as a Distinguished Fellow of the African Association of Agricultural Economists 2013, in recognition to his enormous scholarly contributions and leadership in agricultural economics, especially his contributions to African agriculture over many years.

Some of his publications can be accessed at the following links:

http://www.afre.msu.edu/people/jayne

http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=O9rASnEAAAAJ&hl=en



Prof. Keijiro Otsuka  (Japan) National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS) 

Prof. Keijiro Otsuka is a Professor of Development Economics at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies (GRIPS), in Tokyo, Japan. Kei (as popularly referred) has made seminal contributions to diverse branches of agricultural and development economics on the basis of careful empirical research. He has published prolifically; 7 coauthored and 12 co-edited books, more than 100 journal articles, 80 book chapters, and 12 book review articles. His election to the positions of president of the International Association of Agricultural Economists for the 2009-2012 period and of chairman of the Board of Trustees of the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) for the 2004-2007 period is a testament to his international reputation and leadership.

Learning about the fear of future famines in Asia, he became interested in food security and agricultural development in this region. As a result, he studied agricultural economics at the Tokyo Metropolitan University under Professor Yujiro Hayami, and at the University of Chicago under Professors Theodore W. Schultz and D. Gale Johnson. He became professor of economics at Tokyo Metropolitan University, before joining the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies in 2001. 

He is extremely talented in coordinating collaborative projects. When he was a visiting scientist at IRRI from 1986 to 1989, he organized a seven-country comparative study on “The Differential Impact of the Green Revolution between Favorable and Unfavorable Areas in Asia,” together with C.C. David. This study became a classical contribution in this area. Having revisited sample households first surveyed in the late 1980s in recent years, he published another book with J.P. Estudillo and Y. Sawada to explore the structure of dynamic changes in rural poverty in Asia in comparison with the current situation of selected African countries.

He is interested not only in agricultural development but also in institutional economics. His interest in the latter led to path-breaking research on the efficiency of share tenancy, which had been hotly debated in the 1970s and 1980s. In collaboration with his colleagues, he undertook a global review of the theoretical and empirical literature and successfully synthesized the diverse views on share tenancy in a highly consistent but critical fashion. He received the Quality of Research Discovery Award of the AAEA for his 1992 article in the Journal of Economic Literature. 

He joined the International Food Policy Research Institute as a visiting research fellow from 1993 to 1998. He again demonstrated a genuinely rare ability to organize a collaborative project, this time covering three countries in Africa and four countries in Asia. Based on the results of careful empirical studies, he published a new classical book in the area of land tenure and natural resource management with Frank Place. 

While he believes that development of the small-scale farm sector is essential for poverty reduction in poor economies, he also believes that the development of labor-intensive non-farm sectors is indispensable to provide ample employment opportunities for the poor. Thus, he has inquired into the development processes of the manufacturing sector based primarily on his own questionnaire surveys and applying his rich experience in rural household surveys. He and his colleagues published a unique study on the development of township and village enterprises in China and a number of papers and a few books on the long-term development of industrial clusters in prewar Japan, and contemporary Asia and Africa.

He is a strong advocate of the Green Revolution in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). As the chairman of the Board of Trustees of IRRI, he has been particularly successful in shaping the new mission and the strategic vision for IRRI with a new focus on disadvantaged SSA. Since 2008, he has been a major adviser to the Coalition for African Rice Development, which aims at doubling rice production in SSA in ten years from 2008 to 2018. 

He was inducted as a Distinguished Fellow of the African Association of Agricultural Economists 2013, in recognition to his enormous scholarly contributions and leadership in the field of agricultural economics, especially his contributions to African agriculture over many years.